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Updated: 7 min 15 sec ago

Pfizer Betting Big on Cancer Research in $11.4 Billion Acquisition of Array BioPharma

35 min 21 sec ago

Pfizer Betting Big on Cancer Research in $11.4 Billion Acquisition of Array BioPharma


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Amazon, ExxonMobil Called Out Over Climate Transparency

35 min 29 sec ago

HSBC Global Asset Management, Investec Asset Management and close to 85 other investors representing a combined $10 trillion in assets are asking companies to comply with the reporting process managed by the Carbon Disclosure Project, a British nonprofit research group that solicits and scores corporate environmental disclosures. Investors and interested observers need “consistent, comparable information collected in one place so that they can benchmark performance and use the data to inform their decisions,” said Emily Kreps, global director of investor initiatives at CDP.


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Scientists Develop New Laser That Can Find and Destroy Cancer Cells in the Blood

55 min 47 sec ago

Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood. And now, researchers have developed a new kind of laser that can find and zap those tumor cells from the outside of the skin.Though it may still be a ways away from becoming a commercial diagnostic tool, the laser is up to 1,000 times more sensitive than current methods used to detect tumor cells in blood, the researchers reported June 12 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.To test for cancer spread, doctors typically take blood samples, but often the tests fail to find tumor cells even if they are present in a single sample, especially if the patient has an early form of cancer, said senior author Vladimir Zharov, director of the nanomedicine center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.If the tests do come back positive, that typically means there's a high concentration of circulating tumor cells in the blood; at that point, the cancer has likely spread widely to other organs and it's often "too late to effectively treat patients," Zharov added. [Top 10 Cancer-Fighting Foods]Years ago, Zharov and his team came up with the idea of an alternate, noninvasive method to test larger quantities of blood with a greater sensitivity. Taking the familiar route, they tested it in the lab, then on animals and recently brought it to clinical trials in humans.The new technology, dubbed the Cytophone, uses pulses of laser light on the outside of the skin to heat up cells in the blood. But the laser only heats up melanoma cells -- not healthy cells -- because these cells carry a dark pigment called melanin, which absorbs the light. The Cytophone then uses an ultrasound technique to detect the teensy, tiny waves emitted by this heating effect.They tested the technology on 28 light-skinned patients who had melanoma and on 19 healthy volunteers who didn't have melanoma. They shone the laser onto the patients' hands and found that within 10 seconds to 60 minutes, the technology could identify circulating tumor cells in 27 out of 28 of those volunteers. Finding and killing tumor cellsThe device didn't return any false positives on the healthy volunteers, and it didn't cause safety concerns or side effects, they said. Melanin is a pigment that is normally present in the skin, but skin cells aren't harmed, Zharov said. Even though the skin produces melanin naturally, this laser technique doesn't harm those cells. That's because the laser light exposes a relatively a large area on the skin (so it's not focused enough on individual skin cells to damage them), while the laser energy is more concentrated on the blood vessels and circulating tumor cells, he added.Unexpectedly, the team also found that after the treatment, the cancer patients had fewer circulating tumor cells. "We used a relatively low energy" with the primary purpose of diagnosing rather than treating the cancer, Zharov said. Yet, even at that low energy, the laser beam seemed able to destroy the cancer cells.Here's how it works: As the melanin absorbs the heat, the water around the melanin inside the cells begins to evaporate, producing a bubble that expands and collapses, mechanically destroying the cell, Zharov said."Our goal is by killing these cells, we can help prevent the spreading of metastatic cancer," he said. But he hopes to conduct more research to optimize the device further to kill more tumor cells, while still being harmless to other cells.They also haven't yet tested the device on people with darker skin, who have higher levels of melanin. Even so, only a very small percentage of African Americans get melanoma.The team hopes to expand the technology to find circulating tumor cells released by cancers other than melanoma. These cancer cells don't carry melanin, so to detect them, the researchers would first need to inject the patients with specific markers or molecules that would bind to these cells so that they can be targeted by the laser. They have so far demonstrated that this technique could work on human breast cancer cells in the lab. * 7 Odd Things That Raise Your Risk of Cancer (and 1 That Doesn't) * 7 Side Effects of Cancer Treatment, and How to Cope with Them * The 10 Deadliest Cancers and Why There's No CureOriginally published on Live Science.


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Did Van Gogh Shoot Himself? Auction of Pistol Reignites Debate.

55 min 47 sec ago

The auction of a pistol said to have been used by the painter Vincent van Gogh to shoot himself has reignited a debate about who actually pulled the trigger: Did Van Gogh commit suicide, or was he shot by someone else?The gun will be auctioned in France on Wednesday (June 19), where it's expected to sell for more than $50,000.For years, most Van Gogh experts have accepted the explanation that he shot himself in the chest with a pistol in a suicide in July 1890. [30 of the World's Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing]Such a gun was found more than 70 years later, in a field near the French farming village of Auvers-sur-Oise where Van Gogh died, and it has widely been accepted as the weapon he used to shoot himself.Van Gogh lived on for 30 hours before dying from the wound. His last words, according to his brother Theo, were "the sadness will last forever."In the years since his death, the Dutch expressionist painter, who cut off his left ear in a dispute with the painter Paul Gauguin has become the archetype of a despairing, suicidal artist overcome by depression.But in 2011, biographers Gregory White Smith and Steven Naifeh argued that Van Gogh didn't shoot himself, but was shot accidentally by 16-year-old Rene Secretan, who was spending the summer in the village.According to their biography "Van Gogh: The Life" (Random House, 2011), Secretan and his brother both befriended and bullied Van Gogh when he stayed at Auvers -- and that Secretan possessed the gun involved.Based on a number of lingering mysteries about the last hours of Van Gogh's life, the authors proposed that the artist was shot during a scuffle with Secretan; then, he implied that he had shot himself, in order to cover for the boys, they wrote in an essay in Vanity Fair.The theory that Van Gogh was shot by another is disputed by some experts on the life of the artist. But Naifeh told Live Science that he was more convinced than ever that Secretan shot Van Gogh. Mystery weaponThe gun being auctioned in Paris next week is a Belgian-made 7mm Lefaucheux revolver -- a popular small caliber handgun at that time.The gun matches the description of the 7mm bullet taken from Van Gogh's body by his doctor, and it is theorized that its low power may be why Van Gogh didn't die immediately, but staggered back to his hotel with the bullet still lodged in his chest.The pistol was found by a farmer in 1965 -- 75 years after Van Gogh's death -- in a field at Auvers, badly corroded and beyond use. It was then given to the family who owned the hotel where Van Gogh died.Gregoire Veyres, the auctioneer for Auction Art who is conducting the sale, told Live Science that an investigation by the writer Alain Rohan determined that the corroded weapon had been buried in the ground for at least 50 years. [In Photos: Van Gogh Masterpiece Reveals True Colors]Since Vincent van Gogh's death in 1890, the works of this Dutch expressionist have become some of the most sought-after paintings in the world. Everett - Art/ShutterstockRohan's investigative work was accepted as valid by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which displayed the gun in a 2016 exhibition about the artist's mental illness, Veyres said.According to Rohan's investigation, the location where the gun was found matched the description of a field where Van Gogh had been painting, and where he is said to have shot himself. The gun was also found with its trigger unlocked, which could indicate that it had been fired before it was discarded. Death debatedAccording to Van Gogh expert Martin Bailey, who writes regularly on the artist for the Art Newspaper in London, the gun is accepted among many Van Gogh scholars as the weapon that he used to take his own life."I believe it highly likely, although not certain, that it is the actual gun," Bailey told Live Science, adding that the Van Gogh Museum had also stated there was a "strong possibility" that this was the gun he used.While the 2011 biography by Smith and Naifeh was "excellent," he said, many Van Gogh experts didn't accept their theory."I am convinced that it was suicide, not murder or manslaughter," he said. "Van Gogh's family and close friends believed it was suicide."Naifeh, who won a Pulitzer Prize with Smith in 1991 for their biography of the American painter Jackson Pollock, said his discussions with forensic experts had strengthened his belief that Secretan shot the artist."I have only become more convinced that it is more likely that he was shot in a scuffle than that he wasn't," he told Live Science.Naifeh noted that there was no evidence linking the gun either to Van Gogh or to the manner of his death."What forensic evidence is there to tie Vincent van Gogh to this gun? And, even if there were forensic evidence tying Vincent to this gun, what does this say about who pulled the trigger?" he asked: "Those are the two big questions, and I do not see any answers."Although Van Gogh is one of the most famous artists in the world -- one of his paintings of a farmed field, completed a year before his death, sold for $81 million in 2017 -- he sold only one painting during his lifetime, for 400 francs.The most expensive Van Gogh painting to date was sold for $82 million in 1990, the "Portrait of Dr. Gachet" from 1890. Gachet was the doctor who would ultimately attend his death later that year. * 11 Hidden Secrets in Famous Works of Art * Gallery: Hidden Gems in Renaissance Art * Can Machines Be Creative? Meet 9 AI 'Artists'Original article on Live Science.


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Should I Be Worried If I Have To Pee *All* The Freakin' Time?

56 min 47 sec ago

Prettttyyyy tired of waiting in bathroom lines.


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Look up! The Strawberry Moon will shine bright tonight

59 min 50 sec ago

Be sure to look up from your phones for a few minutes tonight to see the Strawberry moon, which will be visible all night from sundown to sunrise.


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Amazon, ExxonMobil Called Out Over Climate Transparency

1 hour 59 min ago

HSBC Global Asset Management, Investec Asset Management and close to 85 other investors representing a combined $10 trillion in assets are asking companies to comply with the reporting process managed by the Carbon Disclosure Project, a British nonprofit research group that solicits and scores corporate environmental disclosures. Investors and interested observers need “consistent, comparable information collected in one place so that they can benchmark performance and use the data to inform their decisions,” said Emily Kreps, global director of investor initiatives at CDP.


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More EU leaders sign up to carbon net-zero goal by 2050 ahead of summit

2 hours 8 min ago

BRUSSELS/BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany has joined a growing number of EU nations to back going carbon neutral by mid-century, EU documents show, building momentum for the bloc's leaders to agree the ambitious climate goal at a summit this week. Divisions remain among the bloc's 28 governments over the long-term net-zero emissions target, with many concerned a steeper pace of reductions could hurt competitiveness and cost jobs in high-employment sectors. U.N. negotiators hope the gathering of EU heads of state - the last before global climate talks in September - will show commitment to the 2015 Paris pact to limit the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius.


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EU leaders to debate push for zero emissions by 2050

2 hours 16 min ago

EU leaders will this week discuss setting a target of zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, European officials said Monday, following elections that highlighted climate change fears. European Union leaders meeting Thursday and Friday in Brussels will debate the 2050 target of "climate neutrality" that the environmental group WWF says now has the support of 16 of the EU's 28 countries. "As the effects of climate change become more visible and pervasive, we urgently need to step up our action to manage this existential threat," a draft of the EU's strategic agenda for the next six years says.


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Pope Francis Just Convinced These Big Oil CEOs to Change Their Message on Climate Change

2 hours 17 min ago

Pope Francis Just Convinced These Big Oil CEOs to Change Their Message on Climate Change


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Climate talks held as Arctic ice melts, concerns grow

2 hours 17 min ago

Diplomats and climate experts gathered Monday in Germany for U.N.-hosted talks on climate change amid growing public pressure for governments to act faster against global warming. Officials meeting in the western city of Bonn for the June 17-27 talks are focusing on resolving issues that couldn't be agreed upon at last December's climate summit in Poland. The talks are taking place against a backdrop of mounting concerns about global warming that have been heightened by extreme weather events and other signs that man-made climate change may already be leaving its mark on the planet.


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Pillsbury Bread Flour Recalled Due to Possible E. Coli Contamination

2 hours 52 min ago

It's the second baking product to be recalled in the last two weeks as CDC agents link flour to an ongoing E. coli outbreak.


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U.S. records 22 new measles cases, bringing year's total to 1,044

3 hours 5 min ago

Most of the new cases occurred in New York, with 13 occurring in Rockland County and eight in New York City, a CDC spokesman said. Health experts say the virus has spread among school-age children whose parents declined to give them the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, which confers immunity to the disease. A vocal fringe of U.S. parents, some in New York's ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities, cite concerns that the vaccine may cause autism, despite scientific studies that have debunked such claims.


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U.S. records 22 new measles cases, bringing year's total to 1,044

3 hours 16 min ago

Most of the new cases occurred in New York, with 13 occurring in Rockland County and eight in New York City, a CDC spokesman said. Health experts say the virus has spread among school-age children whose parents declined to give them the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, which confers immunity to the disease. A vocal fringe of U.S. parents, some in New York's ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities, cite concerns that the vaccine may cause autism, despite scientific studies that have debunked such claims.


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Regeneron (REGN) Presents Positive Data on Lymphoma Candidate

4 hours 5 min ago

Regeneron (REGN) reports positive early-stage data on REGN1979 in patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.


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Kenya tests woman for Ebola, as Congo, Uganda fight outbreak

4 hours 27 min ago

Kenyan doctors are testing a hospital patient in western Kenya who has Ebola-like symptoms, as eastern Congo is struggling to control the outbreak and Uganda has reported two deaths from the deadly hemorrhagic fever. The female patient in Kenya is in isolation at Kericho County Referral Hospital where staff took precautions to ensure minimal contact, county spokesman Timothy Kimei said in a statement.


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Budget Airline IndiGo Orders 280 Jet Engines in $20 Billion Deal

4 hours 34 min ago

The order by IndiGo, operated by InterGlobe Aviation Ltd., for 280 engines to power Airbus A320neo and A321neo aircraft will include service and maintenance, the airline statement said. CFM International, the GE-Safran venture, will deliver the first engine by 2020.


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Blood pressure pill has potential to slow down Alzheimer’s disease

4 hours 45 min ago

A cheap blood pressure pill could slow down Alzheimer's disease by improving flow of blood to parts of the brain linked to memory, research suggests. Dutch research found that those given the pills for six months saw a 20 per cent increase in circulation of blood to the hippocampus. The drug, called Nilvadipine, is among a class of calcium channel blockers, costing less than 50 pence a day, which are commonly prescribed to reduce the risk of high blood pressure. Scientists said the findings suggest that the decrease in blood flow in patients with Alzheimer’s disease could be reversed. But they said it was too early to say if this could slow down progression of disease. FAQ | Dementia The study by Radboud University Medical Centre in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, involved 44 participants, half of which were given nilvadipine with half given a placebo for six months. At the study's start and after six months, researchers measured blood flow to specific regions of the brain using a unique magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. Study lead author Professor Jurgen Claassen, of Radboud University Medical Centre in Holland, said: "This high blood pressure treatment holds promise as it doesn't appear to decrease blood flow to the brain, which could cause more harm than benefit. "Even though no medical treatment is without risk, getting treatment for high blood pressure could be important to maintain brain health in patients with Alzheimer's disease." Researchers said sample sizes were too small and follow-up time too short to reliably study the effects of this cerebral blood flow increase on structural brain measures and cognitive measures. In numbers | Dementia and Alzheimer's A larger study involving more than 500 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease did not show the drug had an impact on the condition. However, those with mild symptoms of disease did have a slower decline in memory. High blood pressure is already a known risk factor for dementia. The condition affects 850,000 people in the UK, of which around six in ten have Alzheimer's disease. Dr Laura Phipps, from Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “We know high blood pressure is a risk factor for developing dementia but it’s unclear whether blood pressure-lowering drugs could improve memory and thinking in people with Alzheimer’s. “There is strong evidence that there are things we can do to keep our brain healthy as we age. This includes keeping our blood pressure and cholesterol in check as well as not smoking, only drinking within the recommended limits, eating a balanced diet, and staying mentally and physically active.”


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Kenya tests woman for Ebola, as Congo, Uganda fight outbreak

5 hours 27 min ago

Kenyan doctors are testing a hospital patient in western Kenya who has Ebola-like symptoms, as eastern Congo is struggling to control the outbreak and Uganda has reported two deaths from the deadly hemorrhagic fever. The female patient in Kenya is in isolation at Kericho County Referral Hospital where staff took precautions to ensure minimal contact, county spokesman Timothy Kimei said in a statement.


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Pfizer to buy cancer drug developer Array for $10.64 billion

5 hours 49 min ago

The offer of $48 per Array share represents a premium of about 62% to the stock's close on Friday. Array's shares surged 56% in light premarket trade. Pfizer has been investing in cancer drugs and gene therapies in the face of competition for its blockbuster pain drug Lyrica.


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